All Crap or Does Intrapreneurship Really Work

Innovation Posted 13 Oct 2011 by Daniel Kraft

"That is all crap!" You must love Gunter Dueck for his inability to hide his opinion. I was just reading a blog by Markus von Aschoff (Genius + Manager = E(I)ntrepreneur) about how larger corporations tackle innovation when I saw that Dueck called our aproach of Everybody is Beautiful to be all crap.

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Manager Syndrom kills Entrepreneurship

I think Dueck is a great thinker and awesome entertainer. But I also believe he is spoiled by too many years in big organizations. The idea that you need a manager to make a great idea succeed is like giving up on true entrepreneurship to fit into the corporate structure. Yes, there are people with different talents, which is the way I believe that teams of founders have a better chance than individuals on their own. But the “manager syndrome” is the killer of many great ideas and company.

Shield Ideas from "Corporate"

In order to really harvest the power of the entrepreneurial spirit, companies should shield it from the managers. I know from personal experience that the success of an internal idea is often related to how much it is kept away from “corporate”. Just look at the OpenText social networking activities. At the time we started the project we were at the forefront of the market competing head-to-head with pure plays like Jive. After the “managers” took over, many key people have left the company and now it is just “part of the suite”.

Good but not Extraordinary

In fact IBM and to some extent OpenText are good example to illustrate the issue. The companies are well managed and achieve good financial results, which might just be the priority of managers and investors. But to achieve extraordinary entrepreneurial results you need to break the culture of “corporate”. You need to become a pirate. This is really, really hard and all the projects we do here suggest that you need to shield the idea from the the manager and only hand it back when it is ready to survive the exposure of the corporate world.

Picture: HUGH MACLEOD

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